Multimedia journalism = bad journalism?

How does convergence impact journalism?

Which newsaper is the first one to break the news? Who has the most interesting story? Who has the most powerfull picture? And did anyone get it on film?

Journalism is no longer just journalism. A journlist needs more qualities than just a ”sharp pen”. The readers expect more – and that more has to be found on the readers’ smartphone and laptop. This fact makes the days at any newspapers’s office more stressfull than ever. Yesterdays news ar are no longer the only ones laying in the garbage, the last hours news are too. Former editor of ”Ekstra Bladet”, Geir Ruud, said this in 2012: ”What has changed is that we don’t own the news on our own anymore, now we are sharing it with the audience, asking them for it”. He believes that working in convergent news is about changing the news culture to provide a more dynamic and responsive news. (Ivo Bruum, 2013)

Skjermbilde 2014-07-30 kl. 16.11.37(Screen shot, Ekstra Bladet 30.07.14)

For me, it seems like many online newspapers are more interested in getting the most ”clicks” (a good headline is everything) than actually create good journalism, especially in the sports and entertainment sectors (everything seems like a sensation today …doesn’t it?). Producing news is getting more expensive, and there are the ads and clicks that make the income. This pressure can lead to mistakes, on such as ethics, research or as simple as the grammar.

On the other hand; No doubt that the right use of multimedia can turn into sensational  storytelling.
That is what I think journalism is all about.

mostviewd heraldsun (Screen shot, The Herald Sun 30.07.14)

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Meeting the expectations of availability

– How common or widespread is the use of multimedia journalism in the media?

Your hand stumbles through the dark and hits “snooze”. Eventually, 30 minutes later you are sitting by the breakfast table catching up on the latest news. Actually you are catching up on all the newspapers’ headlines at the same time. No, you don’t have ten newspapers in front of you – you are using the same little device that also is your alarm clock. Scrolling down your Twitter feed you know exactly what have been happening around the world during the hours you where asleep. Up comes a headline that interests you – you decide to click on it. What you now see is text, videos and several photos. You start to read, but after reading a few lines you jump down to a video and hit “play”

. Skjermbilde 2014-07-21 kl. 17.05.52
(Screen shot via Twitter)

I want it all, I want it now
Today every news medium has a website:
The Age
The Herald Sun
ABC
(And so on…)

And that is an absolute necessarity to keep up with the readers’ expectations. News is not published once a day, but all day (and night). A newspaper is no longer just text and pictures you find in your mailbox every morning, but text, photos, vidoes, links and even the opportunity to add your own feedback. The “old” newspaper is loosing its readers, and the journalists are loosing their jobs because of it. At the same time the readers’ expectations for constant available news just seem to increase – and today’s newspapers know this. Therefore, the art of journalism is changing. As professor in journalism, media and communication, Brian McNiar, writes: “Newspapers are dying, but long live the news”.

(Video: Digital newsreport 2014, by Reuters Institute)